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Making jam and canning is all the rage these days. It’s cool to be a grandma, which is good because I am slowly turning into one. So, this post isn’t anything that hasn’t already been done before. None the less, anything homemade is better than anything store bought… I have already eaten all the fig jam we made! You can pretty much find any jam or canning recipe you want online and there are lots of cute canning books out there too.

We made two kinds…strawberry balsamic and drunken fig jam.

Strawberry Balsamic Jam

8 cups washed and hulled strawberries
5 cups sugar
1/2 teaspoon unsalted butter
5 Tablespoons balsamic vinegar

Pour the strawberries into a large, deep, heavy pot and bring to a boil over medium heat.  Once the strawberries are boiling, add the sugar and stir until it is dissolved.  The sugar tends to burn on the bottom, so keep it moving until it is thoroughly dissolved.  Bring to a boil and then add the butter.  (The addition of butter keeps the foam volume down.)  Turn the heat down to medium low and boil the jam gently for 40 minutes, until thickened to a loose, soft jam.  Stir in the balsamic vinegar.

Bring 6 half-pint jars and their bands to a boil in a large pot of water fitted with a rack. Boil for 10 minutes. Remove the jars with tongs (the tongs don’t need to be sterilized). Simmer new lids in a small pan of hot water, to soften the rubberized flange. When the jars are dry but still hot, use a slotted spoon to fill the jars with the strawberries, leaving 1/2 to 3/4 inch of headspace. Wipe the rims, set on the lids, and screw on the bands fingertip tight. You can water bath can the syrup the same way you do the jam, refrigerate it for around 3 days, or discard it.

Place the jars on a rack in a big pot and add enough water to cover the jars by 3 inches. Cover the pot and bring to a boil over high heat, then lower the heat to medium and gently boil the jars for 10 minutes. Remove the cover and then, after about 5 minutes, remove the jars. Allow them to rest on a dish towel for 6 hours. Check the seals and store in a cool, dark place for up to a year. Refrigerate after opening.

Recipe found on LA Phemme Phoodie

Drunken Fig Jam

We used black and green figs for this one as we were able to pick a bag full of figs from my friends house (there is a tree in my backyard, but the figs never get ripe, bummer!). The black figs were purchased from the farmers market.

  • 2 lemons
  • 4 pounds ripe fresh figs (preferably black), stemmed, cut into 1/2-inch pieces (about 9 cups)
  • 4 cups sugar
  • 3/4 cup brandy or Cognac
  • 1/2 teaspoon coarse kosher salt

Using vegetable peeler, remove peel from lemons (yellow part only) in long strips. Cut peel into matchstick-size strips (about 3 tablespoons).

Combine lemon peel, figs, sugar, brandy, and 1/2 teaspoon coarse salt in heavy large deep saucepan; let stand at room temperature 1 hour, stirring occasionally.

Bring fig mixture to boil over medium-high heat, stirring until sugar dissolves. Reduce heat to medium; continue to boil until jam thickens and is reduced to 6 cups, stirring frequently and occasionally mashing mixture with potato masher to crush large fig pieces, 30 to 35 minutes. Remove from heat.

Ladle mixture into 6 hot clean 1/2-pint glass canning jars, leaving 1/4-inch space at top of jars. Remove any air bubbles. Wipe jar threads and rims with clean damp cloth. Cover with hot lids; apply screw bands. Process jars in pot of boiling water 10 minutes. Cool jars completely. Store in cool dark place up to 1 year.

This recipe was courtesy of epicurious

 Adding cute tags makes for a good gift too!

Happy jamming!

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  1. October 6, 2011

    This post makes me want to break into my stash of Strawberry Balsamic Jam. Glad you enjoyed it!

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